Caturday Special: The Sand Cat, Felis margarita

The sandcat, one of the cutest and most amazing cats on the planet. This small, adorable bundle of fluff has been known to eat desert monitor lizards its own size and venomous snakes – although mostly it eats small rodents, lizards, birds and insects. They rarely drink, using their efficient kidneys to obtain moisture from their prey. They’re just unbelievable, something this cute should not be so tough but they are hard as nails and can teach us a lot about how we should adapt to our environment rather than unsustainably developing techniques and technologies that force our environment to adapt to us.

Be more sandcat.

On the Origin of a Species – The Slow Worm, Anguis fragilis

A look at one of the world’s most interesting reptiles and one of Britains few native reptiles, the slow worm, anguis fragilis – looking at its evolutionary history, remarkable behaviours and why they’re so great.

Men, We Need to Talk About Violence

A long-read about maleness, masculinity and masculinised violence. Looking at how violence disproportionately affects, and is perpetrated by, men. My discussion on the psychological, sociological and anthropological implications and potential ideas of how we can help moving forward.

Grown Up’s Guides: UK Fossil Hunting

A guide by an adult for adult so they can feel more comfortable going with friends, family or their children to enjoy a day out hunting for fossils. Why? Because it’s cool and there’s a lot to see and learn about like bones and teeth and dinosaurs and ammonites and ammonoids and bivalves and crinoids and trilobites and sharks teeth and all this wonderful stuff. Just get out and do it!

On the Origin of a Species: The Red Panda, Ailurus fulgens

A look at this taxonomically, physiologically, anatomically confusing but absolutely, undoubtedly cute little species, the red panda, Ailurus fulgens. Once thought related to raccoons, or the giant panda, it now stands in a family of its own proving, even to cynics like me, that taxonomy is not just useless bickering about arbitrary classifications.

We Lack Discipline Reads: The Bet – Chapter 1

We Lack Discipline analyses the first chapter of Vivienne Tuffnell’s excellent novel ‘The Bet’. A hard open, with lots of natural symbolism of death, decay, pain and suffering.

Caturday Special: The Leopard, Panthera pardus

With this study of the leopard we have written about every extant pantherine. There are no more big cat species of that genus left to cover. The leopard is a beautiful, generalist, opportunist species adapted for a wide variety of habitats, explaining it’s wide distribution. It is a cat also associated with the Greek God Dionysus, the God of wine.

My Life and Disappointment

A look at expectation and reality in the human mind and how they can lead to disappointment with the focus being on people who have low expectations and for whom the reality is even lower. People with bad luck who are being failed because society refuses to acknowledge the reality of how life works.

Is That a Wasp? A Simple Wasp Identification Guide

A short and simple guide, with lots of pictures, of how you can try and tell what’s a wasp from what isn’t. Also a simple description of how you will certainly fail!

Roman History in a Nutshell: The Pyrrhic Wars – The Battle of Heraclea, 280 BCE

Covering the build up to and cause of the Pyrrhic wars. With Roman influence spreading they were bound to bump up against the greater greek world, magna graecia, sooner or later. The city of Tarentum would be the trigger and they would ask King Pyrrhus of Epirus for help – putting Rome in conflict with the Hellenic Kingdoms for the first time. The Battle of Heraclea would be the first major battle, resulting in a loss for Rome, but significant casualties for Pyrrhus.